So why don't you kill me?
orchiddynasty:

Paphiopedilum leucochilum 'Snow Kimono' (Thailand)

My Followers I have asked nothing of you.
That changes tonight.
Acquire me one of these plants. My gratitude will be forever yours.

orchiddynasty:

Paphiopedilum leucochilum 'Snow Kimono' (Thailand)

My Followers I have asked nothing of you.

That changes tonight.

Acquire me one of these plants. My gratitude will be forever yours.

neuroticdream:

I have died everyday waiting for you on We Heart It.

neuroticdream:

I have died everyday waiting for you on We Heart It.

The world was getting really small

So I imagined you were with me.

The hole in my chest was growing

So I picture you holding me.

The storms are coming again

So I thought of us building a fort.

The colors are turning grey

So you gave me a red rose.

I thought of many things,

But at the end of the day

What matters most

Isn’t what I could see us doing

But rather the comfort

Though still in your absence

That I can find

just because I knew you.


This summer, I failed at everything I set out to do, and I’m uncertain of what’s to come. I still know that I will remember my time in NY as well spent months because I met you. I’ve realized I’m still too dependent on my parents and relatives to form relationships like this, and that it’s unfair to you to be with you. 
I tried to rebel against my class standing by working hard, by applying to many places, by doing the things “they” say to do, and the reality is that I have no power. There is nothing I can do; the American dream is for people in their 30’s. The youth are dead. Condemned to drink, smoke, and wallow in entertainment and pop culture. I tried to escape and I failed. I will wear these chains of my youth until after grad school. I just hope I’m able to preserve the enthusiasm for experience and life I currently possess. 

Bumblebee

Bumblebee

Welcome home. Photos from North East Pennsylvania.

rhamphotheca:

Zoo Conservation Work:  Eastern Indigo Snake

Check out one of the Central Florida Zoo's conservation projects in action. Reptile Keeper Jeremy, is tending to eastern indigo snake eggs in a nesting bunker at CFZ's Orianne Center for Indigo Conservation in Lake County. Once the babies hatch, they will be cared for until they reach 3 feet in length to ensure their survival in the wild. Then they get to go on a road trip to southern Alabama to a protected conservation area where they will be wild released to help increase this threatened species numbers in the wild.

(via:Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens)

Photos: RB - arjuno3; BL - rbrausse

Welcome to the Lion’s Den

Welcome to the Lion’s Den

libutron:

Bat Ray | ©divindk   (Channel Islands National Park, California, US)
Myliobatis californica (Myliobatidae), better known as Bat Ray or Bat Eagle Ray, is commonly found in sandy and muddy bays and sloughs, also on rocky bottom and in kelp beds, along the coastal waters of the eastern Pacific, from central Oregon in the US to the Gulf of California in Mexico, and in the Galapagos Islands [1]. 
Bat rays are commonly distinguished from other rays because of their distinct, protruding head and large eyes. They have a flat body with a dorsal fin at the base of the tail. The tail is whiplike and can be as long or longer than the width of the body. It is armed with a barbed stinger that is venomous. Bat rays are named for their two long pectoral fins that are shaped like the wings of a bat [2].
Like other ray species, bat rays appear to migrate from inshore waters during the colder months of the year, and return to the same localities year after year [3].

libutron:

Bat Ray | ©divindk   (Channel Islands National Park, California, US)

Myliobatis californica (Myliobatidae), better known as Bat Ray or Bat Eagle Ray, is commonly found in sandy and muddy bays and sloughs, also on rocky bottom and in kelp beds, along the coastal waters of the eastern Pacific, from central Oregon in the US to the Gulf of California in Mexico, and in the Galapagos Islands [1]. 

Bat rays are commonly distinguished from other rays because of their distinct, protruding head and large eyes. They have a flat body with a dorsal fin at the base of the tail. The tail is whiplike and can be as long or longer than the width of the body. It is armed with a barbed stinger that is venomous. Bat rays are named for their two long pectoral fins that are shaped like the wings of a bat [2].

Like other ray species, bat rays appear to migrate from inshore waters during the colder months of the year, and return to the same localities year after year [3].